Categories
Apartments Housing Moving to Boston Uncategorized

What Kind of Apartment is Right for You?

You want an apartment in Boston but don’t know which room is right for you? There are so many options it is difficult to know what is right for you and your lifestyle (or pocketbook). Some floor plans and sizes are better suited for the privacy seeker or the thrift shopper.  But there are some key things to watch out for with each!

Here are the different types of apartment and which could be best for you!

  • Studio: This will often be a single room with a bathroom and kitchenette attached. If you are lucky it might have a full stove and fridge, but many of them come with half fridges and a small two burner stove. A lot of people like the studio because of it’s privacy and ease. However, some people find that the studios can be overpriced and lacking on space due to the tight constraints of Boston’s old buildings. If you want to share a studio with a roommate, you should check with your landlord/building management because there are certain Boston city codes on how many people can live in a certain square footage.
    • Cost:
      • Low end: $1000-$1600/
      • High end: $1600-$2500
    • Pro’s: Your own space!
    • Con’s: Pricey and Amenities can be lacking

 

one bedroom floor plan

  • One Bedroom: One bedrooms are similar to a studio and can be almost the same square footage. However, someone bedrooms have the ability to fit two people, one in the bedroom and one in the living room. These apartments are called “one-bedroom-splits” or just “splits” to keep it simple. These can be economical and make the rent easier to handle. My roommate and I currently have this structure and were lucky to find a one bedroom that had two entrances. Make sure this is okay with your landlord before you turn a 1-bedroom unit into a split. (I put up an accordion door in mine to make it a split since the living room didn’t have a door.
    • Cost (per month):
      • Low: $1500- $2100
      • High: $2200-$2700
    • Pro: Fewer people involved, economical
    • Con: Harder to find

 

  • Two Bedroom: Two bedrooms can be great where you can find them. They offer both residents privacy and often come with a living room space that allows for you to have company. One bedrooms are a bit too crowded to have friends over. It’s not impossible but hard! Two bedrooms tend to be more expensive than their one-bedroom-split counterparts because they tend to be larger and are
    • Cost:
      • Low: $1700-$2500
      • High: $2500-$3000
    • Pro: Common area, won’t be lonely!
    • Con: More expensive than a split

 

  • Three Bedroom: Three bedrooms are a nice compromise for people that want to share an apartment but are trying to cut back on the amount of liability. When you have roommates there is always some risk factor. The more people pitching in the higher the chances that someone will: not be available right before you sign the lease, have financial difficulties, or other unforeseen circumstances that would cause them to be unable to offer their portion of the rent. The more bedrooms, the cheaper you can get a nice place as well, so it’s a trade-off.
    • Cost:
      • Low: $2100-$3000
      • High: $3000-$4000
    • Pro: More people, cheaper price
    • Con: Increased Liability, possibly only one bathroom

 

  • Four Bedroom: Four Bedroom apartments offer some of the best rates. Why? Because of how difficult it is to get four people to agree on an apartment! Often times there will be one or two people who do the looking and then decide on the place. If you do get a four bedroom, you will be able to find someone to take a room, but it may not be someone you want to live with. A great way to find roomies is to check your school website for housing connections and your grad program Facebook page. Emerson has a great one and that’s where I met my roommate!
    • Cost:
      • Low: $3000- $4000
      • High: $4000-$6000
    • Pro: Cheaper! Easier to find since not many people put in the time to get them
    • Con: Increased Liability, Application approval may be harder since each person has to apply for the room separately

 

  • Five Bedroom: The five-bedroom is a mystical place that I have seen on my searches, but never heard of anyone that made it work. This layout tends to apply to homes where there are common areas and multiple bathrooms.
    • Cost:
      • Low: $ 3500-$4500
      • High: $4500-5500
    • Pro: Cheaper, multiple bathrooms ensured
    • Con: May not be the newest location/ house comes with other problems (cutting the yard, increased utilities, etc.)

There are many different kinds of apartments. For myself, my parent’s were co-signers and wanted me to be with a reputable property management company. My one bedroom was perfect since they worked with me from afar and send pictures, floor layouts, and we did all our paperwork online

If you won’t be able to see the apartment before renting, this is called, “site unseen viewing.” Make sure that this is okay with the apartment or agent that you are working with. Not everyone is willing to do it for liability reasons. However, you will find many agents who are willing to show you a Skype or Google Hangouts video call and show you the apartment.

Thanks for reading! And check back next week for the Top 5 Questions You Should Ask When Looking For an Apartment.

Until next week, Happy Friday Bookworms!

Sincerely,

Kime J. Sims.